Are There Enough Enjoyable Moments in Your Life?

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Have you ever thought about your life’s purpose? What you’re working so hard for and why it matters?

life

Last year, I found out my friend, who would now only be 49 years old died. When he was alive, did whatever he wanted without a care in the world. He made lots of money, partied like tomorrow didn’t exist, and lived life to the fullest!

Another friend died just a week ago. She was a little older. Two years older than my mom, to be exact. Her husband is currently in a convalescent home and on a respirator, while her 6 kids and grandchildren decide on whether they could be strong enough to accept the death of another parent.

Then today, I heard about the 24 year old baseball player, Jose Fernandez who died in a boating accident. He was about to be a first-time father and sadly, his journey through life ended so quickly.

I don’t know if dying at an early age is more or less significant than dying at an old age. I think they’re both pretty significant. The mom with 6 kids and 16 grandchildren left some great memories behind, while a young man still has so much of life to live. To me, neither case seems fair.

I really don’t understand why, but I seem to be thinking about life and death a lot lately. Then the news about Jose Fernandez made me feel even worse. I don’t know who he is nor do I even follow baseball, but somehow the idea of his pregnant girlfriend and his family who is most likely crushed, not to mention all his fans and team mates, who mourn his death, has me feeling incredibly sad.

It doesn’t matter if we’re an overzealous entrepreneur, a proud mother who worked really hard to raise 6 beautiful kids, or a successful athlete. We all end up in the same place, no matter what we do in life. And no matter how advanced we are in medicine or technology, death is inevitable. Will we reincarnate, go to heaven, or just turn to dust?

I then wonder why it matters so much what we then do with our life if we are completely nonexistent. What if we don’t even turn into a fly on the wall? Who then cares what we are or how we live our life? Does it matter if we live it fully or not? Nobody truly knows what’s going to happen, regardless of how religious we think we are or how much research we’ve done about the after life. Fact is, nobody alive has ever truly been there. So we don’t know.

Yes, it’s true – I’ve turned into a Debbie Downer who wonders if it’s pointless to keep dreaming for the life I wish I could still have at the expense of time spent with my son or husband. Or do I live as many moments as I could being care-free, which isn’t actually realistic, because every step I seem to take lately requires some sort of monetary exchange.

I’ve also heard many people talk about cherishing the important people in our life. Of course, nobody would ever want sadness or anger or negativity for that matter, to be the last memory we have with anyone, in case an end time does come for any special person in our life. Do we then spend every moment we possibly can with that person (or people) and be sweet and passive no matter what happens? That could be very draining, especially if they have the potential to annoy you.

My parents, for example, are so important to me, but I can’t seem to keep myself under control when they say or do something that really irritates me. They’re in their 60s now and I know I would some day regret all the times I argued with them or spent time away, simply because I was filled with so much anger over things that will most likely be pretty insignificant later on.

I’ve heard many motivational speeches and quotes about thinking positive and enjoying every moment in life, because none of us really knows when our end time will be. I guess it all depends on what we think “enjoying every moment in life” really means.

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