The Heart Pounding Parental Stress Caused by Temper Tantrums

  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

Many parents are lucky not to have to go through it, but other parents just reach that unnerving stress level when temper tantrums kick in.  Sometimes it’s at locations that you wish you just had not stepped into.

Parental Stress Caused by Temper Tantrums

I had a really upsetting conversation with  my dad about me “spoiling my child.” I grew up in a home, where understanding was not part of any equation. You either do or do not do something and if you did something that wasn’t right, there were consequences.

My 2 year old had been very bad tempered. We were up early to go somewhere and his sleep was shortened by 3 hours, it was extremely hot, and he just had not had much to eat because of it either. He was in a mess.

My dad took this behavior and added it together with all the other unfortunate temper tantrum incidents and came to the conclusion that I was lacking in good parenting skills.

I do my best to solve my little guy’s tantrums with trying to make him comfortable. If I know he’s completely comfortable, but just out of line, I usually ignore him and let him cry it out before I talk to him about his issues.

According to an article on NPR, children have to get past their point of anger before you can reason with them in any way.  The shrieks of noise that triggers nerves in your system causing your heart to pound unbelievably fast and your head to want to explode can only be cured by allowing the noise to lessen on its own. Sometimes it can happen really quickly and sometimes it can take up to an hour, a face full of tears, and an outfit drenched in sweat from the kicking and waving arms.

Sometimes, the trick of the “quick distraction” of noise (or pretend noise) works. My son loves fire engines, ambulances, helicopters, and any moving vehicle. So we always play a game called, “what’s that noise?” When he’s having a major breakdown, I sometimes will put my finger to my lips and quietly say, “Huh! Oh! I think I hear a fire engine coming!” I get a 70% success rate with this one.  But of course you would know what sort of distractions can be good for your own child.

I would love any help or suggestions you can give as to tricks you’ve found to help stop temper tantrums.